Volume 5, Issue 2, June 2020, Page: 52-59
A Retrospective Malaria Surveillance Data Analysis (2013-2017), Benishangul Gumuz Region, 2018
Tadesse Yalew Assefa, Public Health Emergency Management Center, Ethiopian Public Health Institute, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Eyoel Berhan, Department of Public Health, Saint Paul’s Hospital Millennium Medical College, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Zewdu Assefa, Public Health Emergency Management Center, Ethiopian Public Health Institute, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Habtamu Tilahun, Public Health Emergency Management Center, Ethiopian Public Health Institute, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
Received: May 27, 2020;       Accepted: Jun. 10, 2020;       Published: Aug. 4, 2020
DOI: 10.11648/j.bsi.20200502.13      View  74      Downloads  20
Abstract
Routine Malaria surveillance data is useful for assessing incidence and trends over time and in stratification for targeting of malaria. The reporting completeness and potential bias of such data needs assessment. Approximately 52 million people (68%) live in malaria risk areas in Ethiopia, primarily at altitudes below 2,000 meters. Objective: The general objective of this analysis was to assess the trend and magnitude of Malaria surveillance data by time, place and laboratory result for the last five years in Benishangul Gumuz Region. Descriptive cross-sectional study was used to analyze Malaria surveillance data in terms of time, place and laboratory result. Data cleaning and analysis was made by using excel 2013 software. A total of 96757 expected health facilities were in the region from 2013-2017. A total of 86266 health facilities were reported in the last five years with an average completeness of 89.2%. In the last five years (2013-2017) total of 1186514 clinically and confirmed malaria cases were reported regionally with 2290606 total malaria suspected fever examined with ninety inpatient deaths. Among the total clinically and confirmed cases, 1172244 (98.8%) were outpatients, 14248 (1.2%) were inpatients and 1013046 (85.0%) cases were confirmed by laboratory. Out of the total confirmed malaria cases 811984 (80.2%) cases were due to P.falciparum malaria and 201030 (19.8%) cases were due to P.vivax malaria. There were no other species of malaria reported other than these two species. From the total expected health facilities; a total of 86266 health facilities were reported in the last five years with an average completeness of 89.2% which is above the WHO minimum requirement (80.0%). The malaria reports shows that significant improvement in cases of data quality and management from year to year and currently all zones, Woredas and health facilities including private and NGO facilities are included and reported weekly the malaria surveillance from the data report identified in this study. The average five year regional incidence of confirmed malaria (P. Falciparum and P. Vivax) was less than half the incidence of the clinical and confirmed malaria cases.
Keywords
Malaria, Morbidity, Mortality, Clinical and Confirmed, Benishangul Gumuz
To cite this article
Tadesse Yalew Assefa, Eyoel Berhan, Zewdu Assefa, Habtamu Tilahun, A Retrospective Malaria Surveillance Data Analysis (2013-2017), Benishangul Gumuz Region, 2018, Biomedical Statistics and Informatics. Vol. 5, No. 2, 2020, pp. 52-59. doi: 10.11648/j.bsi.20200502.13
Copyright
Copyright © 2020 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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