Volume 3, Issue 1, March 2018, Page: 1-6
Determinants of Time to First Marriage Among Rural Women in Ethiopia
Yihenew Mitiku, Department of Statistics, College of Natural & Computational Science, Assosa University, Assosa, Ethiopia
Demeke Kiffle, Department of Statistics, College of Natural & Computational Science, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia
Dinberu Siyoum, Department of Statistics, College of Natural & Computational Science, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia
Belay Birlie, Department of Statistics, College of Natural & Computational Science, Jimma University, Jimma, Ethiopia
Received: Feb. 23, 2018;       Accepted: Apr. 18, 2018;       Published: May 9, 2018
DOI: 10.11648/j.bsi.20180301.11      View  803      Downloads  59
Abstract
Age at marriage is of particular interest because it marks the transition to adulthood in many societies; the point at which certain options in education, employment, and participation in society are foreclosed. This study aimed to investigate demographic and socioeconomic factors affecting age at first marriage in Ethiopian women. The data source used for the analysis was the 2011 Ethiopian Demographic and Health Survey, which is country representative survey. The study considered 10,417 women aged 15-49 years from nine regions and one city administration. Accelerated failure time model was used for identifying factors associated with age at first marriage. The median time for age at first marriage was 17 years (95% CI: 16.90, 17.10). Based on Akaike’s information criterion (AIC) the Log-logistic accelerated failure time model was found to be the best model in describing the age at first marriage among other candidate models. The result based on this model showed that region, women’s educational level, wealth index and religion significantly affect timing of first marriage. Women who had secondary and higher education prolonged time-to-first marriage by the factor of ɸ =1.42 and ɸ =1.46, respectively. Women from Oromia, Somali, SNNP and Dire Dawa have prolonged time to age at first marriage by ɸ=1.02, ɸ=1.05, ɸ=1.08, and ɸ=1.09 respectively. However, women from Amhara region (ɸ =0.89), Benishangul-Gumuz region (ɸ =0.95) and Gambela region (ɸ =0.95) had a significantly higher risk of early first marriage compared to their counterparts in the Tigray region. The acceleration factors for middle wealth index and rich are 0.99 and 0.98 respectively using poor household reference. This implied that poor household women have longer time-to-age at first marriage. Improving girls and young women access to education is important for rising the women’s age at first marriage, which is vital for empowering them and enhancing their participation in any sector.
Keywords
Survival Data Analysis, Time to First Marriage, Accelerated Failure Time Model, Marriage
To cite this article
Yihenew Mitiku, Demeke Kiffle, Dinberu Siyoum, Belay Birlie, Determinants of Time to First Marriage Among Rural Women in Ethiopia, Biomedical Statistics and Informatics. Vol. 3, No. 1, 2018, pp. 1-6. doi: 10.11648/j.bsi.20180301.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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